EX SITU CONSERVATION OF SEVERAL SPECIES OF SUCCULENT

  • A. STOIE University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, 3-5 Manastur Street, 3400 Cluj-Napoca
Keywords: botanicalgarden, Sempervivum, Cactaceae, succulent plants, ex situ conservation

Abstract

The species of succulent plants belong to several families of angiosperms and are spread throughout several regions of the globe. In nature, many species of succulent plants are endangered, especially as a result of human intervention in their natural habitats. In the climatic conditions of Transylvania, Romania, a large number of succulent plants can be successfully cultivated outdoors during their entire growth period by means of a special conditioning of the soil with plastic foil and pebbles. Most of the species under scrutiny in the Agrobotanical Garden of the University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca have shown a good or satisfactory development. Two species only have shown an unsatisfactory development. In case of the plants that have been kept unprotected during the entire year, 7 taxons out of 9 have shown a good development, one taxon a satisfactory response and one taxon an unsatisfactory response. In case of the plants that require protection during their dormant period, out of 114 examined taxons, belonging to 100 species, 102 taxons have shown a good response, 12 taxons a satisfactory response and only one taxon an unsatisfactory response. All the species under scrutiny have shown a harmonious development showing a nature-like habit, thanks to the favourable weather conditions during their growing period (summer). Plants originating directly from natural areas, as well as those belonging to endangered species have shown a harmonious development and good vitality.

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Published
2007-08-05
How to Cite
STOIE, A. (2007). EX SITU CONSERVATION OF SEVERAL SPECIES OF SUCCULENT. Notulae Botanicae Horti Agrobotanici Cluj-Napoca, 35(2), 39-47. https://doi.org/10.15835/nbha352212
Section
Research Articles