Solidago gigantea Ait. and Calamagrostis epigejos (L) Roth invasive plants as potential forage for goats

  • Sándor HAJNÁCZKI Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Institute of Crop Production, H-2100, Páter Károly street 1, Gödöllő
  • Ferenc PAJOR Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Institute of Animal Husbandry, H-2100, Páter Károly street 1, Gödöllő
  • Norbert PÉTER Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Institute of Animal Husbandry, H-2100, Páter Károly street 1, Gödöllő
  • Ákos BODNÁR Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Institute of Animal Husbandry, H-2100, Páter Károly street 1, Gödöllő
  • Károly PENKSZA Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Institute of Crop Production, H-2100, Páter Károly street 1, Gödöllő
  • Péter PÓTI Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Institute of Animal Husbandry, H-2100, Páter Károly street 1, Gödöllő
Keywords: Calamagrostis epigejos; digestibility; feeding value; goat; Solidago gigantea

Abstract

The experiment focused on feed evaluation was conducted with goats to determine the feeding value of two aggressive weeds, the giant goldenrod (Solidago gigantea) and the bushgrass (Calamagrostis epigejos). Studied plants at the pre bloom stage were evaluated for feeding value by 7-month-old castrated goats (n=5 per group, BW=25.0 kg). All animals received no supplemental feed. The two plants differed in content of dry matter (DM) (266 vs. 394 g/kg) as well as in crude protein (119 vs. 86g), crude fibre (222 vs. 317 g) and N-free extract (523 vs. 447 g) per kg DM. In this study, total daily DM intake from giant goldenrod and bushgrass was similar (666 vs. 689 g/goat). Apparent digestibility of these plants was similar for organic matter (58-59%), but differed for crude protein (71 vs 53%) and N-free extract (72-62%). The values of total digestible nutrients (55.9-53.4%), net energy for maintenance (NEm: 4.90-4.54 MJ) and net energy for lactation (NEl: 5.16-4.91 MJ) per kg DM were similar. The study concluded that Solidago gigantea and Calamagrostis epigejos aggressive plants could be interesting feed for goats due to their feeding values. In addition, both of these aggressive weeds are relatively easily available.

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Published
2021-02-09
How to Cite
HAJNÁCZKI, S., PAJOR, F., PÉTER, N., BODNÁR, Ákos, PENKSZA, K., & PÓTI, P. (2021). Solidago gigantea Ait. and Calamagrostis epigejos (L) Roth invasive plants as potential forage for goats. Notulae Botanicae Horti Agrobotanici Cluj-Napoca, 49(1), 12197. https://doi.org/10.15835/nbha49112197
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DOI: 10.15835/nbha49112197