Variation in Nigella sativa quality and its standardization via instrumental analysis: A study based on geographical origin

  • Rizwan AHMAD Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Natural Products and Alternative Medicines, Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, College of Clinical Pharmacy, P.O Box # 1982, Dammam 31441
  • Niyaz AHMAD Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Natural Products and Alternative Medicines, Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, College of Clinical Pharmacy, P.O Box # 1982, Dammam 31441
  • Mohd AMIR Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Natural Products and Alternative Medicines, Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, College of Clinical Pharmacy, P.O Box # 1982, Dammam 31441
  • Fatima AlJHISI Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Natural Products and Alternative Medicines, Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, College of Clinical Pharmacy, P.O Box # 1982, Dammam 31441
  • Marwah H. ALAMER Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Natural Products and Alternative Medicines, Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, College of Clinical Pharmacy, P.O Box # 1982, Dammam 31441
  • Heba R. AL-SHABAN Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Natural Products and Alternative Medicines, Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, College of Clinical Pharmacy, P.O Box # 1982, Dammam 31441
  • Bayan M. ALSULTAN Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Natural Products and Alternative Medicines, Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, College of Clinical Pharmacy, P.O Box # 1982, Dammam 31441
  • Zainab A. ALSADAH Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Natural Products and Alternative Medicines, Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, College of Clinical Pharmacy, P.O Box # 1982, Dammam 31441
  • Noor A. ALDAWOOD Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Natural Products and Alternative Medicines, Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, College of Clinical Pharmacy, P.O Box # 1982, Dammam 31441
  • Shahanas CHATHOTH Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Dammam
  • Aslam KHAN King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Basic Sciences Department, College of Science and Health Professions, Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs, Jeddah
Keywords: India; instrumental analysis; Nigella sativa; Saudi Arabia; standardization; quality

Abstract

Black seeds (Nigella sativa) owe an important place due to its more demand as a food as well as medicine. A lack of information does exist regarding the quality and safety for market-available food-grade samples of black seed (BS). The aim of this study is to investigate the quality and standardize the BS samples according to world health organization (WHO) guidelines of instrumental analysis and pharmacological activities. Instrumental analysis was performed with the help of ASE (accelerated solvent extraction), IR (infrared spectroscopy), UHPLC (ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography) and NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy) whereas ash values and chemical tests were applied for physicochemical analysis. DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl), ABTS (2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) and cytotoxicity assay were performed as well. A high extract yield (g) with recovery of 4.4 ± 7.7 (22%) for Pakistani, 3.3 ± 4.7 (16.5%) for Indian and 3.02 ± 10.2 (15.1%) for Saudi Arabian sample. Chemical tests showed the presence of phenolic compounds and flavonoids. Saudi Arabian samples showed less amount for ash values (total-, water soluble- and acid insoluble ash). The samples were standardized further with the help of NMR and IR. A significant amount of micro- and macronutrients was observed in Saudi Arabian sample. With regard to the major active substance Thymoquinone (THQ; ng/mL), the order of concentration was observed as; Saudi Arabian sample (33141.1) > Pakistani (7677.2) > Indian sample (3998.6). A more potency for Saudi Arabian sample was observed during antioxidant and cytotoxicity assays. The method was successful to effectively discriminate the samples from different geographical origin, in terms of quality.

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Published
2020-08-25
How to Cite
AHMAD, R., AHMAD, N., AMIR, M., AlJHISI, F., ALAMER, M. H., AL-SHABAN, H. R., ALSULTAN, B. M., ALSADAH, Z. A., ALDAWOOD, N. A., CHATHOTH, S., & KHAN, A. (2020). Variation in Nigella sativa quality and its standardization via instrumental analysis: A study based on geographical origin. Notulae Botanicae Horti Agrobotanici Cluj-Napoca, 48(3), 1141-1154. https://doi.org/10.15835/nbha48311957
Section
Research Articles