Cadmium Effects on Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis L.) Morphology and Cd Uptake in Relation to Substrate Acidity/Alkalinity

  • Anastasia AKOUMIANAKI-IOANNIDOU Agricultural University of Athens, School of Plant Sciences, Department of Crop Science, Laboratory of Floriculture and Landscape Architecture, Iera Odos 75, 11855 Athens
  • Despoina KAPAMA Agricultural University of Athens, School of Environment and Agricultural Engineering, Department of Natural Resources Development and Agricultural Engineering, Laboratory of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry, Iera Odos 75, 118 55, Athens
  • Aggelina MPANTOUNA Agricultural University of Athens, School of Environment and Agricultural Engineering, Department of Natural Resources Development and Agricultural Engineering, Laboratory of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry, Iera Odos 75, 118 55, Athens
  • Nicholas K. MOUSTAKAS Agricultural University of Athens, School of Environment and Agricultural Engineering, Department of Natural Resources Development and Agricultural Engineering, Laboratory of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry, Iera Odos 75, 118 55, Athens
Keywords: extractable Cd; cadmium accumulation; hyssop; medicinal plants; uptake

Abstract

Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis), is a herb with a wide range of use in food preparation and herbal medicine. It is a perennial shrub through which pollutants such as Cd may enter the human food chain Therefore, the aim of this research was to examine the extent to which Cd added to the growth substrate is accumulated by hyssop plants and whether Cd affects the plant’s morphology. Hyssop plants were grown in pots containing a uniform mixture of either moderately acidic or slightly alkaline substrate consisting of peat and perlite (1:1 v/v) to which Cd (CdSO4*8/3H2O) was added (0-control, 1, 2 and 5 mg Cd L-1) during the course of growth. No symptoms of toxicity or nutrient deficiency as well as no differences in plant height were attributed to Cd application irrespective of the growth stage or substrate. Cadmium uptake by aerial organs (shoots) and underground organs (roots) of hyssop increased with Cd application and was higher in the moderately acidic than in the slightly alkaline soil environment. Hyssop is a Cd accumulator and accumulation occurred mainly in the roots in the acidic substrate. Measurement of extractable Cd by diethylene triamine penta acetic acid – triethanol amine (DTPA-TEA) could be used to predict Cd uptake by hyssop plants.

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Published
2019-12-23
How to Cite
AKOUMIANAKI-IOANNIDOU, A., KAPAMA, D., MPANTOUNA, A., & MOUSTAKAS, N. K. (2019). Cadmium Effects on Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis L.) Morphology and Cd Uptake in Relation to Substrate Acidity/Alkalinity. Notulae Botanicae Horti Agrobotanici Cluj-Napoca, 47(4), 1394-1399. https://doi.org/10.15835/nbha47411755
Section
Research Articles